Kitchenette building analysis

Kitchenette building prezi

There was material always, walking or running, fighting or screaming or singing. Brooks would eventually combine the details and observations of her life on the South Side with formal techniques she had mastered early on. Though Gwendolyn Brooks grew up in a house, she spent much of her young married life in a kitchenette. There are other moments that make the ending seem less pessimistic than it might first appear. Unlike metaphor, which is based on similarity, metonymy is based on contiguity or proximity. All rights reserved. They were cramped microcosms of the circumscribed lives endured by most African Americans at the time. And the phrase comes across as a giddy phrase.

Similar to the effect of the use of "you" in Levine's poem, this broadens the meaning of the poem to include not just Brooks, but all the buildings residents; perhaps all African American people at the time. This is gives the poem an interesting rhythm and, in combination with the "we", makes it feel like a conversation with the reader, or like you are reading the poet's thoughts.

The other members of the household expect her to cater to all the domestic chores including the kitchen-ones. Any line reproduced from the article has to be appropriately documented by the reader.

kitchenette building number five

Back then amongst all of the typical every day activities that were essential for life, it was a luxury to dream. She pervades poetry from cover to cover; she is all but absent from history. This explains the epithet. Women, as the house-hold keepers are supposed to be always available, with no questions, only commands.

A street in bronzeville

Unlike metaphor, which is based on similarity, metonymy is based on contiguity or proximity. Though Gwendolyn Brooks felt bleak confronting her first home as a married woman, in time she felt other things, including joy and even inspiration. Women, as the house-hold keepers are supposed to be always available, with no questions, only commands. In fact, Brooks might argue that the torturous journey her poems were required to take helped make them poems at all. And the phrase comes across as a giddy phrase. Her needs are minimal; and therefore basic. The world of the kitchenette building is also the world of a dream that slips away into symbol and metaphor. You are forced to think about your own views on dreams and how to keep them alive. However, surely not for more than a minute, for that is the only time that she has: Since Number Five is out of the bathroom now, We think of lukewarm water, hope to get in it. Although the whole poem does not rhyme, the first and last word of each stanza rhyme which give it a nicer rhythm to read and give it structure. Thy are not very colorful. The entire third stanza is a rhetorical question. They were cramped microcosms of the circumscribed lives endured by most African Americans at the time. Metonymy is the rhetorical device that substitutes a part of something for the whole. Located at South Champlain, it was a comfortable home with a large front porch and backyard.

Not for a minute! In fact, Brooks might argue that the torturous journey her poems were required to take helped make them poems at all.

we real cool analysis
Rated 7/10 based on 23 review
Download
Gwendolyn Brooks: “kitchenette building” by Hannah Brooks